Leaving a gift in your Will

If you would like to share your reasons for supporting Combat Stress with a legacy to be considered for our website or on our marketing materials, please contact Sarah Seddon at Sarah.Seddon@combatstress.org.uk or 01372 587144.  

 

Testimonials from supporters                   

Testimonials

Hywel Davies is from Wales and was a linguist and teacher by profession.

‘Combat Stress, as the veterans’ mental health charity for over 97 years, is an important cornerstone of the UK mental health voluntary sector. That is why I give to Combat Stress, dead or alive.’ 

‘As Saint John Paul II said at Oriole Park, Baltimore in the United States of America in 1995, “Freedom consists not in doing what we like, but in having the right to do what we ought.” I support Combat Stress because I have an interest in supporting mental health charities and because I have an interest in helping people who offer their lives, metaphorically speaking or otherwise, to defend their country and all that the country stands for, namely freedom, responsibility, tolerance, solace, justice, family and voluntarism.

‘There is a link between mental illness and trauma and to see a veteran try to rebuild his or her life after undergoing trauma and experiencing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder is something worth fighting for.

‘Combat Stress, as the veterans’ mental health charity for over 97 years, is an important cornerstone of the UK mental health voluntary sector. That is why I give to Combat Stress, dead or alive.’

Patricia Testimonial

 

Patricia is a long-term supporter of Combat Stress from Stockton-on-Tees.

‘They need our help NOW and in the future.’

‘I became interested in Combat Stress when I saw an advert in a paper about the charity in the late 1980s. I was interested partly because of what happened to my uncle after World War I, and also because of growing up during World War II from the age of four.

‘My late father was one of five children. His oldest brother, William Henry Bell, joined the Army and he returned home to England at the end of World War I in 1918. In 1922 he was admitted to St. Mary’s Hospital near Morpeth, where he remained until his death in 1960.

‘He was eventually employed as a landscape gardener at the hospital. I never met Uncle Billy, but when he died my father asked me to go to the hospital with him. I found the whole experience quite traumatic. I suppose his illness would be called PTSD today.

‘People who have been in the Armed Forces, who fought to keep the rest of us alive and safe and suffer greatly as a result, they need our help NOW and in the future.

‘I think there is no such thing as a war to end all wars. Look at the world today!’